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Coordinator for student disability support

I was a coordinator for student disability support because…

Ember Kelly

I firmly believe that higher education should be accessible to all.

I was working as a gardener when I saw the Access for Deaf Students Initiative advertised at the University of Bristol. I’m severely to profoundly Deaf. I was encouraged to apply, as notetakers would be provided so we could study and follow lectures. I got a degree in Social Policy, then did a Masters and a PhD in Human Geography.

After my doctorate, a vacancy came up in Disability Services at the university. I got the job, and the notetaking service I’d found invaluable as a student was now run by me!

At work, I relied on British Sign Language (BSL) interpreters and electronic notetakers. Don’t ever feel bad about needing support! Without it, I wouldn’t have been able to study or do my job.

I retired early and am now a gardener again and an artist. Choose something you’ll enjoy. Check the support available. Pace yourself – being deaf is tiring. And remember, you have unique skills to offer.

Ember Kelly