overlay

Take a look at our member-only pages!


The page you’re about to view is part of our member-only content – but we’re giving you 5 previews of the fantastic online resources available to you through membership

You have 5 previews left after this one. You’ll then be invited to join our supportive community of more than 65,000 parents, deaf young people and professionals. Membership is free and gives you access our services and resources:

  • Connect with others through events, workshops, campaigns and our online forum.
  • Discover information and insights in our resource hub and receive the latest updates via email and Families magazine.
  • Access one-to-one support and tailored services which help reduce barriers for deaf children.
  • Borrow technology and devices which support deaf children’s communication and independence.

Click here to become a member today or

To close this window and view the page, please use the X

Members area

Loading...

Register

Don't have a login?

Join us

Become a member

  • Connect with others through events, workshops, campaigns and our NEW online forum, Your Community
  • Discover information and insights in our resource hub and receive the latest updates via email and Families magazine
  • Access one-to-one support and tailored services which help reduce barriers for deaf children
  • Borrow technology and devices which support deaf children’s communication and independence
Menu Open mobile desktop menu

English teacher

I'm an English teacher because...

I enjoy sharing my passion for stories, poetry and creative writing. I volunteered for youth groups before university and this ignited my desire to be a teacher.

My first language is British Sign Language (BSL) so studying for a degree in English Literature was challenging. After graduation I moved to Thailand to get experience in the classroom. It was difficult to teach without BSL support but I enjoyed myself.

I moved back home to train as an English teacher to pupils aged 11–17. I’m in my probationary year and, as a BSL user, it’s been difficult teaching in a mainstream school and can be quite isolating but my mentor has been extremely supportive.

I’m profoundly deaf and wear a cochlear implant. I speak when teaching but use a BSL interpreter to translate what the children are saying.

I recently set up a BSL club to encourage hearing pupils and school staff to learn.

Jamie Dow