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Vet

I’m a vet because…

No two days are ever the same and I never stop learning. Although I love working with animals, the most rewarding part is working with owners to make sure each animal gets the best care.

At school I was told it would probably be too hard for me to become a vet because I have 60dB hearing loss in each ear. My parents were incredibly supportive and my mum, in particular, encouraged me to aim high.

I’ve been a vet for three years and I’m now an intern at a referral hospital treating dogs and cats. It’s the first step to becoming a specialist.

Situations where I can’t lip-read are difficult, including where masks are worn during surgery or when the lights have to be turned off for an examination. When I’m consulting I face the person speaking to me and it’s usually quiet (except for the occasional barking dog!). I have a stethoscope with amplifiers so I can listen to my patient’s heart and lungs.

Lauren Hamstead