Members area

Sign in

Register

Don't have an account?

Join us

Member benefits

  • Information and advice Information and advice to help support deaf children and young people
  • Free Families magazine Inspirational stories, information, support and advice in print and online
  • Email newsletters Information, tips and real-life stories relevant to your child’s age
  • Test our tech Trial new technology to find what works for your child at home or in school
Menu Open mobile desktop menu

Competitive swimming

Photo: Get information and support to make swimming more competitive

The competitive pathway for deaf swimmers is different from hearing swimmers but can include opportunities to compete in mainstream, disability and deaf-specific competitions.

Some deaf children may prefer to participate in mainstream swimming as there are opportunities to swim in a wide range of high level galas, against the very best swimmers, while others may prefer to participate in deaf swimming as this could be more socially and culturally appealing.

Take a look at GB Deaf Swimming to learn more about competitive deaf swimming.

Tips for swimming coaches

  • Don’t cover your mouth with your hand, paper, pen or whistle and don’t chew gum or eat.
  • Demonstrate technique corrections, rather than relying on verbal explanations.
  • Use visual aids such as whiteboards.
  • Present one form of visual information at a time.
  • Write down key words, swimming jargon and new vocabulary.
  • Use video analysis for technique correction.
  • Practice touch starts and lighting starts in training.
  • Some deaf swimmers can hear the start signal – don’t assume.
  • Be aware of meets such as GB Deaf Nationals.
  • Be aware that some swimmers may have balance problems.
  • Some swimmers may prefer an outside lane, near the starter signal.
  • Notify competition organisers that a deaf swimmer is attending.
  • Create a preparation checklist for deaf-friendly swimming galas.

Every swimming coach and team manager knows that swimming galas can be hectic and confusing, especially for first time competitors. Make sure you are fully prepared by using our handy checklist for deaf-friendly swimming galas.

Things to ask the parent or swimmer

  • What level of deafness do you have?
  • How do you like to communicate?
  • Do you use any equipment to help you hear?
  • How do you prefer to start the race (beeper, strobe or touch)?

Things to bring

  • Dry box for hearing aids and cochlear implants
  • Dry wipe board, pens and eraser
  • Coloured flags
  • Strobe light for race starts
  • Handheld flashing alarm

Other considerations

  • Is there an auditory, visual emergency signal, or both?
  • Does everyone know what the alarm means?
  • Do you need another emergency signal, such as an agreed visual gesture?
  • Are lifeguards and receptionists aware that deaf competitors are attending?
  • Are any swimmers competing for the first time?
  • Are swimmers in the appropriate lane based on their preferred start method?
  • Do you need to make changes to your risk assessment?
  • If staying overnight, who is responsible for alerting deaf swimmers to an emergency during the night?