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A Level language experience

Discussion
Posted by solero
09/11/21 01:43 PM

Hi, Our 16 year old daughter has moderate-severe hearing loss and is considering studying Spanish A Level. She's doing really well in this suject at GCSE but I am nervous that the leap in level will prove a challenge, especially in terms of the listening and speaking components. Does anyone here have experience of studying an A Level Modern Foreign Language with hearing loss? Was it all ok? Is there anything extra our daughter should consider?

Discussion
Posted by cc ndcs volunteer host
15/11/21 11:29 PM

Hi solero

Thank you for starting this thread.  I am sorry that you have not had any comments yet - Your Community is still very new and new members are joining each week. 

If you need any further support, please feel free to contact our Helpline team (https://www.ndcs.org.uk/our-services/services-for-families/helpline/ ).

Best wishes!

 

Discussion
Posted by alice
25/11/21 10:04 AM
Discussion
Posted by cc ndcs volunteer host
15/11/21 11:29 PM

Hi solero

Thank you for starting this thread.  I am sorry that you have not had any comments yet - Your Community is still very new and new members are joining each week. 

If you need any further support, please feel free to contact our Helpline team (https://www.ndcs.org.uk/our-services/services-for-families/helpline/ ).

Best wishes!

 

Hi, My daughter is moderately deaf and did A level French.  She enjoyed it so much she is studying it at degree level  as half of a dual degree.  We ensured the school knew what help she was allowed by looking up the exam boards documentation.  The school did not know so its important you do this.  She got her class teacher to carry out the verbal questions in the exam, with extra time.  She also got extra verbal tution once a week as much as possible though I don't think it was a huge amount. 

I was unsure about her doing the A level at first - I am moderately deaf myself and not very good at languages.  But I'm pleased I didn't stop her, though I did encourage her to stop and think about it before signing up.

Good luck!

Emily

Discussion
Posted by larrinazuzi
25/11/21 04:58 PM
Discussion
Posted by alice
25/11/21 10:04 AM

Hi, My daughter is moderately deaf and did A level French.  She enjoyed it so much she is studying it at degree level  as half of a dual degree.  We ensured the school knew what help she was allowed by looking up the exam boards documentation.  The school did not know so its important you do this.  She got her class teacher to carry out the verbal questions in the exam, with extra time.  She also got extra verbal tution once a week as much as possible though I don't think it was a huge amount. 

I was unsure about her doing the A level at first - I am moderately deaf myself and not very good at languages.  But I'm pleased I didn't stop her, though I did encourage her to stop and think about it before signing up.

Good luck!

Emily

I echo what Emily has said. While I didn't do an A level language, I discovered that I wanted to carry on with learning french in adult education. My main purpose for doing it was to learn to lipread French conversation and it was really successful for me. I have a severe bilateral impairment and while it was challenging, it was also very rewarding as well. 

So I would say, go for it! All the best! 

Lindsay

Discussion
Posted by solero
25/11/21 06:32 PM
Discussion
Posted by alice
25/11/21 10:04 AM

Hi, My daughter is moderately deaf and did A level French.  She enjoyed it so much she is studying it at degree level  as half of a dual degree.  We ensured the school knew what help she was allowed by looking up the exam boards documentation.  The school did not know so its important you do this.  She got her class teacher to carry out the verbal questions in the exam, with extra time.  She also got extra verbal tution once a week as much as possible though I don't think it was a huge amount. 

I was unsure about her doing the A level at first - I am moderately deaf myself and not very good at languages.  But I'm pleased I didn't stop her, though I did encourage her to stop and think about it before signing up.

Good luck!

Emily

Thanks so much. This is very encouraging. Our daughter is already supported in her GCSE Spanish (the teacher reads the listening paper so she can both lipread and listen). We will need to chat with her teachers about how this can continue into her A Level studies.

How exciting your daughter has continued her French to degree level. It's so important our kids can do what they enjoy and are good at. We wish her all the best with her studies. Many thanks again.


Discussion
Posted by solero
25/11/21 06:36 PM
Discussion
Posted by larrinazuzi
25/11/21 04:58 PM

I echo what Emily has said. While I didn't do an A level language, I discovered that I wanted to carry on with learning french in adult education. My main purpose for doing it was to learn to lipread French conversation and it was really successful for me. I have a severe bilateral impairment and while it was challenging, it was also very rewarding as well. 

So I would say, go for it! All the best! 

Lindsay

Thank you. It is so lovely to know others have taken this path. Our daughter finds language learning very rewarding too. I think hearing loss can make for remarkable communication skills. Well done with your French. Thanks again.